Darwin Community Legal Service

Completing The NDIS Access Request Form

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The NDIS Access Request Form when submitted by the applicant is accompanied by an NDIS Access Request – Supporting Evidence Form. The NDIA use the information contained in the form to determine if a person meets the requirements to become a participant in the National Disability Insurance Scheme. A request for access can be refused solely on the lack of medical information contained in the Access Request – Supporting Evidence Form.

Sections 2 and 3 of the Access Request – Supporting Evidence Form must be completed by a health or education professional.

The relevant section in relation to “disability requirements” is section 24 of the National Disability Insurance Scheme Act 2013.

When completing the Access Request – Supporting Evidence Form it must be shown that the person has a disability that is attributable to one or more of the following:
– Intellectual
– Cognitive
– Neurological
– Sensory
– Physical

OR

– To one or more impairments attributable to a psychiatric condition

AND

– The impairments or impairments are, or are likely to be permanent.

AND

– The impairment or impairments result in substantially reduced functional capacity to undertake, or psychosocial functioning in undertaking, one or more of the following activities –

  • Communication – being understood in spoken, written or sign language, understanding others and express needs and wants by gesture, speech or context appropriate for age. Does the person require assistance to communicate effectively because of their disability?
  • Social interaction – making and keeping friends, interacting with the community (or playing with other children), coping with feelings and emotions. Does the person require assistance to interact socially because of their disability?
  • Learning – understanding and remembering information, learning new things, practicing and using new skills. Does the person require assistance to learn effectively because of their disability?
  • Mobility – mobility/motor skills moving around the home, getting in or out of bed or a chair, leaving home and moving about in the community. Does the person require assistance because of their disability?
  • Self-care – (not for children under 2) showering, bathing, dressing, eating, toileting, caring for own health. Assistance required does not include commonly used items such as slip mats, bathroom grab rails and stairway rails. Does the person require assistance with self-care because of their disability?
  • Self management – doing daily jobs, making decisions, handling money (not for children under 8). Does the person require assistance with self-management because of their disability?

AND

– The impairment or impairments affect the person’s capacity for social or economic participation

AND

– The person is likely to require support under the National Disability Insurance Scheme for the person’s lifetime.